Propulsid Litigation Lawyer Says: Unnecessary Drug Killed 80 People

 

Propulsid was a popular nighttime heartburn drug before it was pulled in the market in March of 2000. It was linked to dozens of fatal heart rhythm abnormalities. A Food and Drug Administration (FDA) document associated the drug with 341 reports of heart rhythm abnormalities and 80 reported deaths. The FDA also acknowledges that only a small fraction of problems with a drug are ever reported.

Propulsid was used to treat severe nighttime heartburn in adult pations with gastroesophageal reflux disease, also known as GERD. The labeling had to be changed many times to account for the growing toll of heart disease and death caused by the drug, and finally after 7 years on the market it was pulled by the FDA. At the time of the Propulsid recall more than 350,000 Americans were taking Propulsid. It is estimated that over 30 million Americans took the drug since it went on the market in 1993. At the time of the recall it was one of Johnson & Johnson's best selling drugs.

This is just another example of an unnecessary treatment causing pain and death. The vast majority of patients with GERD can control and cure the disease with a carefully regulated diet and increased water intake. Taking a drug to repress acid reflux just represses the excess acid, neither curing the condition nor removing it from the system. Throwing unnecessary drugs at conditions that could be cured through lifestyle changes is one of the factors leading to this country's epidemic of medical errors. Over 80 people have died from using Propulsid when it was not even necessary to cure their condition.

If you or a loved one have suffered from these adverse effects of Propulsid and are one of the many who have not yet spoken up, contact a lawyer and discuss your options immediately. Class action lawsuits have placed the blame squarely on the drug manufacturer, and if you participate in litigation you can claim damages as well as help the public assess the true numbers of people hurt by dangerous drugs and medical errors.

 



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